Intermedia

Intermedia

In the late 1950s, a transitive sense of medium, or intermedium, arose as a response to the advent of what were then the new media: television and radio. Originally coined by Coleridge in 1812, the term was reintroduced by artist and theorist Higgins to refer to works that fall conceptually between the different art media as well between art and life media, such as eating, sleeping or walking, the Duchampian ready-made (an ‘ordinary’ object manufactured for a functional purpose and subsequently transferred to the realm of art), or Cage’s 1952 composition 4’33’’ in which the performer remained silent during 4 minutes and 33 seconds inviting the audience to a multi-sensorial appreciation of all events unfolding in time-space.
For many intermedial artists, since the 1950s, an intermedium–analogue, digital, or both–is a space-time of perpetual interpenetration of the most varied elements and factors, a space-time of ‘open’ relationality that crystallises micro-relationships across epistemic and ontological terrains, established logics, and orders of magnitude.